Working In Your Therapy Business versus Working On Your Therapy Business

Sounds the same, but there is a significant difference between both statements.

Working In Your Therapy Business

Working “in” or “inside” your therapy business usually entails you working as a therapist in your business, basically you instead of being employed and in a job for another, you created a job for yourself.

Now this isn’t wrong nor bad, and if you enjoy being a solopreneur therapist, then great! But if you aspire to hire great teams and build up your therapy business, you can start off with being a full time therapist in your therapy business, but eventually you have to either:

  • be a part time therapist
  • or full time manager/CEO to…

Work ON Your Therapy Business

Working on your therapy business means to put in the time and effort to streamline and improve your therapy business processes and as a whole. This can mean or involve improving:

  • therapy marketing automation using tech and therapy website marketing
  • front counter and reception appointment booking, billing and other processes
  • therapy sales initiatives
  • decreasing unnecessary expenses and costings
  • eliminating unnecessary processes (this is one of my favorite, which is to cut-short and remove unnecessary steps)
  • studying your therapy business finance, strengths, weaknesses, opportunities and threats as a whole
  • what kinds of problems is the business facing and what you need to do to solve it and prevent it from recurring in the future
  • spending time thinking, reading and attending courses to improve your skills as a therapy business owner

Even if you’re a one-therapist therapy business, working on your business is vital for your business to survive and thrive as the focus is constantly on how to deliver better therapy services whilst making processes easier, expenses lower and generally more fun.

If you’re planning to build and grow your team, you need to spend time working on your business: if you’re spending all your time just treating clients (which is not a bad thing for clients and for single-therapist therapy businesses), how can you see the macro-view of what is your therapy business is doing and grow your therapy business?

At this point in writing since January 2018, I am not affiliated to any therapy businesses whatsoever as I've stepped down from Urbanrehab management and leadership position though I am still a significant minority; and am taking a sabbatical to spend time with children, wife and family; pondering my next steps and I hope to publish some books if possible.

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